About Robert Galbraith (AKA J.K. Rowling) (2022)

What’s the motivation and inspiration behind the Cormoran Strike novels?
What approach is taken to the development of the characters, the plots, the locations and everything else, in these intriguing and complex stories?

Writing as Robert Galbraith

I’ve always loved detective fiction, Agatha Christie, Ruth Rendell, Margery Allingham and PD James, I love them all.

I wanted to have a go at writing a contemporary whodunit, with a credible back story.

Part of the appeal and part of the fascination of the genre is that it has clear rules. I’m intrigued by those rules and I like playing with them. Your detective should always lay out the information fairly for the reader, but he will always be ahead of the game. There are certain immutable laws of detective fiction that I follow.

Yes, I really wanted to go back to the beginning of a writing career in this new genre, to work without hype or expectation and to receive totally unvarnished feedback. I wanted it to be just about the writing. It was a fantastic experience and I only wish it could have gone on a little longer than it did. I was grateful at the time for all the feedback from publishers and readers, and for some great reviews. Being Robert Galbraith was all about the work, which is my favourite part of being a writer.

Since my cover has been blown, I continue to write as Robert to keep the distinction from other writing and because I rather enjoy having another persona.

I certainly wanted to take my writing persona as far away as possible from me, so a male pseudonym seemed a good idea. It doesn’t consciously change the way I write. I think I write differently, because it’s a very different genre.

I chose Robert because it’s one of my favourite men’s names, because Robert F Kennedy is my hero and because, mercifully, I hadn’t used it for any of the characters in the Potter series or The Casual Vacancy.

Galbraith came about for a slightly odd reason. When I was a child, I really wanted to be called ‘Ella Galbraith’, and I’ve no idea why. I don’t even know how I knew that the surname existed, because I can’t remember ever meeting anyone with it. Be that as it may, the name had a fascination for me. I actually considered calling myself L A Galbraith for the Strike series, but for fairly obvious reasons decided that initials were a bad idea.

Odder still, there was a well-known economist called J K Galbraith, something I only remembered by the time it was far too late. I was completely paranoid that people might take this as a clue and land at my real identity, but thankfully nobody was looking that deeply at the author’s name.

It was the easiest and most plausible reason for Robert to know how the Special Investigation Branch operates and investigates. Another reason for making him a military man working in the civilian security industry was to give him a solid excuse not to appear in public or provide a photograph.

I often start with a kernel of an idea then work out how to get there. I plan and research a lot and know far more about the characters than actually ends up ever appearing in the books. I have colour coded spreadsheets, so I can keep a track of where I am going.

It is how I have always worked. It was the same for the Harry Potter novels. It’s well documented the level of detailed planning that went into those.

Generally, I am quite disciplined in my writing and do try to have a set working day, but I don’t set myself targets of number of words to achieve. Sometimes I consider I have had a good day if I have deleted a lot of words or have simply done plenty of thinking.

And I never write the title page until the book is finished.

(Video) Robert Galbraith (J.K. Rowling): What you can tell us about the next #Strike? (August 21st, 2021)

About Robert Galbraith (AKA J.K. Rowling) (1)

Troubled Blood

Their relationship takes its biggest step forward so far. Their friendship changes and deepens, and the balance of power in their professional partnership shifts, too, because there are times when Robin has to take on far more responsibility at the agency while Strike’s dealing with significant challenges in his private life. Strike and Robin are also examining their feelings for each other with more honesty than ever before, which is immensely satisfying to write.

Without giving much away, change, loss and absence are probably the biggest themes. The detective agency is investigating a cold case: the mysterious disappearance of a female doctor in 1974, which happens to be the year of Strike’s birth. The changing face of feminism and ideals and stereotypes of femininity are also examined through the cast of characters. The vanished doctor was an ardent feminist who once worked as a Bunny girl. The complexities of Dr Bamborough’s life are mirrored in Robin’s own, because she’s approaching thirty, going through a divorce and asking herself how she could ever reconcile a demanding and sometimes dangerous job with motherhood. Meanwhile the suspects in Dr Bamborough’s disappearance include a womanising patient who seems to have developed feelings for her, a passive-aggressive husband who wanted her to quit her job to become a full-time mother, and a sadistic serial killer active in the 60s and 70s, who was loosely based on real life killers Jerry Brudos and Russell Williams – both master manipulators who took trophies from their victims.

I always knew it would be lengthy, because the investigation spans over a year and because there are such significant developments in each of the detective partners’ private lives. It’s my favourite of the series by far and I think the length is necessary to do the story justice, so I can only hope readers agree (and don’t incur wrist strain.)

I’ve got no intention of quitting any time soon. I’ve already started number six. Being Robert Galbraith is pure pleasure, so as long as I’ve got plots, I’ll keep going!

About Robert Galbraith (AKA J.K. Rowling) (2)

(Video) The biggest literary hoax in a decade

The Books

With four books launched, and the fifth about to arrive, the Strike series combines ongoing themes throughout, with very unique, very different individual crimes in each story.

I’ve loved writing all the Strike books. The classic whodunnit suits the way I plot, and requires a vast array of characters, whose invention I find endlessly satisfying.

In terms of pure enjoyment, I think Career of Evil would come out ahead of the rest, for rather mundane reasons: I didn’t have many interruptions and was able to bury myself in the book for long stretches, which is ideal.

Having said that, my favourite of the four published books is Lethal White, which really couldn’t have been trickier to write, partly because I had so much else going on and partly because I’d chosen not only to create a labyrinthine plot, but also to weave in a lot of developments in Strike and Robin’s personal lives.

There are big developments in both their private lives, particularly Robin’s. The relationship between the detective partners is enormous fun to write because underneath a sound friendship there is so much that is unsaid and barely acknowledged. At the beginning of Lethal White, we see a very big step forward, in that both of them admit to themselves what they’re feeling in a very overwrought and stressful setting. The possibility of something more happening between a very intelligent, self-contained commitment-phobe and a woman who has accidentally become his closest friend and work partner is, I think, what draws readers back to the books. It’s certainly what keeps me writing them.

I try to do a differently constructed plot every single time. It shouldn’t show too obviously, but that’s the challenge for me.

Cuckoo’s Calling, which is a cold case obviously, is probably the most procedural of all the novels that I’ve written. The plot does unfold with the investigation.

Silkwormis utterly different, because of the conceit of the novel within the novel.

Career of Evilis very different again, because you’re looking at three stories that interweave with Strike’s own.

Lethal Whiteagain is different, though some of the work is procedural, I can’t tell you much more without giving too much away.

It’s not, there are actually more than that. The beauty of writing these types of novels is that they each have their own discrete story, so the series is pretty open ended. It will run for as long as I have stories to tell.

About Robert Galbraith (AKA J.K. Rowling) (3)

The Characters

(Video) J.K. Rowling pseudonym Robert Galbraith saga explained

Throughout the stories, you’ll find characters that you love, that you hate, that will make you laugh, that will make you cry – whether it be Strike, or Robin, or any of the recurring characters, to the wide range of intriguing personalities that we get to meet in each story.

I wanted to write classical whodunits with a modern twist. A Private Investigator is invited in to different worlds. It gives me a way of using life experiences and exploring those worlds in depth.

I know a lot of people who have served in the armed forces and who have been kind enough to help with my research. I interviewed serving and ex-military people for as long as they would let me bother them. In fact, all my factual information came from military sources. One of these is from the SIB.

So, while Strike himself is entirely fictional, his career and the experiences he’s had are based on factual accounts of real soldiers. Making Strike a war veteran is both very plausible and exciting novelistically.

One of the reviews I treasured most said that my hero faced his situation ‘with resolve, instead of clichéd self-destruction’. I gave Strike many of the qualities of the military people to whom I am closest: strength of character, black humour, resilience and ingenuity.

Making him an amputee added another dimension, allowing me to show the day to day reality of living with a disability, which many war veterans are having to face these days.

Strike is entirely imaginary. He was a very vivid character who came to me, the best way, he just walked into my head. Whilst he has a basis in several real-life ex-Forces people and veterans I’ve known, in the main he was my creation.

Apart from being an ex-military policeman, my hero is the illegitimate son of a very famous man whom he has only met twice. He’s damaged in certain ways, due to an upbringing that’s quite unusual. Strike gives me a way to talk in an objective, de-personalised way about the oddities that come with fame.

While in the army, Strike had the anonymity he craved; now that he has left, he runs into people who make a lot of assumptions about him based purely on his parentage. He’s a complex character because he’s rooted in the military and partly in the louche world that a lot of people would like to enter without really understanding how damaging that world can be. He is unique as I think every detective should be, but he’s rightly conforming to the rules of detective fiction that make it fair for the reader.

I think Robin is the most purely loveable character I’ve written.She is in deliberate contrast to Strike. She questions what they do a little more than he does and has a more emotional response to the cases. You need that foil for Strike, because he does keep things in his head much more.

She’s not a Watson in the sense that she’s also detecting and becomes a fully-fledged partner, but she still does conform to the classic notion of a Watson, because she still is all of us, asking Strike the questions that we’d all like to know because he’s always one step ahead of the game.

Unwillingly, really, Strike is being broken by this friendship. Robin initially finds him rather unattractive and unsympathetic, but soon starts to admire his work ethic and intelligence. Meanwhile Strike, aware of his susceptibility as a newly single and isolated man, is determined not to become over-fond or reliant on this helpful and undeniably sexy girl.

They are both carrying a lot of secrets when they meet, which weigh them down and they’re both close-lipped about what the central traumas of their lives have been. Over the course of the books they start to open up to each other. It’s a relationship for Strike, with Robin, unlike any he’s had before.

The dynamic between them is I think the thing that keeps people reading and it’s certainly the thing that keeps me writing.

The Locations

The Strike stories introduce you to London in its entirety; North, South, East and West. You also see Strike and Robin journey to different parts of the country, following up clues from Scotland, to Cumbria and to as far south as you can go, to Cornwall.

The prosaic answer is that London is big enough to give Strike a lot of cases without tripping over Rebus, who I think has made Edinburgh his own. In fact, Strike did visit Edinburgh in Career of Evil, and we know his ex-girlfriend, Charlotte, is from Scotland, so I’m not ruling out further trips north of the border, but I never really had any doubts that the series would be London-based.

It’s a city that can support a multitude of fictional detectives, because of its size and variety. I also love the way it easily absorbs incomers.

Neither Strike nor Robin are London-born, though Strike spent large parts of his childhood there. I think the fact that they gravitated to London from the towns of their birth gives them something in common: a hinterland apart from their work, and places of escape and fond recollection that they have yet to show each other.

(Video) Top 5 J.K. Rowling Books (aka Robert Galbraith)

Quiz

How well do you know Lethal White?

Take the quiz and find out if your attention to details and focus and concentration skills are a match for those of Strike and Robin.

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About Robert Galbraith (AKA J.K. Rowling) (4)

Meet Strike and Robin

Cormoran StrikeTell me more
Robin EllacottTell me more
(Video) Robert Galbraith (J.K. Rowling) on who should choose the music on a road trip, Strike or Robin?

FAQs

Why is J.K. Rowling known as Robert Galbraith? ›

Her pen name, according to Rowling, was picked deliberately. "I chose Robert because it is one of my favourite men's names, because Robert F Kennedy is my hero and because, mercifully, I hadn't used it for any of the characters in the Potter series or 'The Casual Vacancy'...

Is J.K. Rowling the same as Robert Galbraith? ›

J.K. Rowling created Harry Potter under her own name, and she's been writing crime novels under a penname, Robert Galbraith.

Did J.K. Rowling write Cormoran Strike? ›

Cormoran Strike is a series of crime fiction novels written by British author J. K. Rowling, published under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith. The story chronicles the cases of private detective Cormoran Strike and his partner Robin Ellacott. Six novels in the series have so far been published.

When did J.K. Rowling start writing as Robert Galbraith? ›

Why do writers use a pen name? ›

Choosing a pseudonym can open the door to new beginnings and new audiences, reimagining the brand into something fresh. A nom de plume can also help an author jump into new genres, since an author's genre and their name can become inexorably linked.

Do I need a pen name? ›

To use or not use a pen name or pseudonym is a personal choice. There's not really a right or wrong answer on this—unless you do share a name with a well-known author and/or celebrity. Just remember: If you do use one, be ready to take on that new persona (even if it's very similar to your actual identity).

How do you legally write under a pen name? ›

You can register a manuscript under a pen name at the copyright office (www.copyright.gov). You'll have to provide some information, including your real address. But if you really want to keep your true identity under wraps, set up a post office box and have information from the office sent there.

What should my author name be? ›

How to create your author pen name? Try to start from your real name and make little changes. Maybe use your middle name, or initials, or a name that's almost the same but a little cooler. Use a friend's name that you've always envied.

Will there be a 7th Cormoran Strike book? ›

On Tuesday, 12th April, J.K. Rowling, on replying to someone on Twitter, revealed that she is currently working on the seventh book in the Strike series! Currently on #7.
...
Detective Leaderboard.
#NameDetective Points
2Mendoza Nicholas5470
3Dr. Werner Madei4675
4DA S2445
5Donna R2155
6 more rows
13 Apr 2022

Does Cormoran Strike marry Robin? ›

Things go from bad to worse when a very distraught (and drunk) Robin confides to Strike that her engagement to Matthew ended after she found out he had been unfaithful while still at uni with Sarah Shadlock. Ultimately, Matthew is able to make it up to Robin and the two are married at the end of the book.

Does Robin divorce Matthew? ›

They are alike in many ways, yet also very different – whether it's their upbringings, their personalities, or their outlook on life – but together they work as a seamless partnership. In this novel, Strike is struggling with his aunt Joan's illness, while Robin is divorcing Matthew.

What should I read if I like Cormoran Strike? ›

Here are five recommendations for murder mystery books with a Cormoran Strike resonance:
  • (1) John Fairfax's Benson and De Vere courtroom dramas.
  • (2) Ian Rankin's John Rebus novels.
  • (3) P. D. James' Cordelia Gray thrillers.
  • (4) Kate Atkinson's Jackson Brodie books.
  • (5) Boris Akunin's Sister Pelagia mysteries.
2 Oct 2019

Who revealed Robert Galbraith? ›

"We, Russells solicitors, apologise unreservedly for the disclosure caused by one of our partners, Chris Gossage, in revealing to his wife's best friend, Judith Callegari, during a private conversation, that the true identity of Robert Galbraith was in fact JK Rowling.

What pen does J.K. Rowling use? ›

She's a billionaire author now, but when Harry Potter scribe J. K. Rowling drafted her famous series about the boy wizard, she used good old-fashioned loose-leaf paper and pen. The Sherlock Holmes author wrote several of his works with a Parker Duofold pen.

How was J.K. Rowling pen name discovered? ›

According to the news agency, Gossage told the best friend of his wife, Judith Callegari, and Callegari was the person who tweeted at a Sunday Times columnist last week, stating that she knew Rowling was behind “Cuckoo.” This prompted the newspaper to launch its own investigation and eventually uncover the fact that ...

What is it called when an author uses a fake name? ›

A pseudonym is a fictitious name taken by a writer in place of their real name. The term "pseudonym" is a Greek word that literally means "false name."

How do I start writing my own book? ›

Following these step-by-step writing tips will help you write your own book:
  1. Establish a consistent writing space. ...
  2. Hone in on your book idea. ...
  3. Outline your story. ...
  4. Do your research. ...
  5. Start writing and stick to a routine. ...
  6. Finish your first draft. ...
  7. Revise and edit. ...
  8. Write your second draft.
2 Mar 2022

Can you write a book under a fake name? ›

Yes, authors can self-publish using their pen name or nom de plume. If you're self-publishing a book, you can definitely use a pseudonym when writing and publishing your book. In fact, many indie authors use a pseudonym or nom de plume when they publish books in several different genres.

Can two authors have the same name? ›

Yes - two authors can have the same name. But your solution is a very good idea - include your middle initial or middle name - so you stand out from the other author.

How do I choose a name for myself? ›

Think about the identity that you intend to cultivate, and choose a name that fits with your vision for the new you. You may have connotations about certain names: tough, sweet, adventurous, etc. Pick a name that helps you become who you want to become. Name yourself after someone inspiring.

How much does it cost to publish your own book? ›

How much does it cost to publish a book in the United States? It usually costs between $500 and $5,000 to publish a book in the United States. A lot of that cost comes from hiring an editor, book designer services, and marketing. The average self-published book costs about $2,000 to publish and market.

How much does a pen name cost? ›

You must pay filing fees of at least $375 when you file your trademark application. If you want trademark protection in multiple commercial classes, you'll have to pay higher fees.

Can you publish on Amazon with a pen name? ›

Yes, you can publish on Amazon with a pseudonym , to preserve your identity, for whatever reason. You can do the same thing on Nook, iBooks, Smashwords and Kobobooks.

Can you publish a book for free? ›

Self-publish eBooks and paperbacks for free with Kindle Direct Publishing, and reach millions of readers on Amazon. Get to market fast. Publishing takes less than 5 minutes and your book appears on Kindle stores worldwide within 72 hours.

How do you begin a story? ›

Try one or more of these strategies.
  1. Strategy 1: Begin with action or dialogue. ...
  2. Strategy 2: Ask a question. ...
  3. Strategy 3: Describe the setting. ...
  4. Strategy 4: Begin with background information. ...
  5. Strategy 5: Have the main character introduce himself or herself.

What is a universal name? ›

A universal name is a name which you can use nearly everywhere to mean the same thing. It's what you get when you see the value of GlobalNaming. Of course names can only be used with perfect reliability inside a formal protocol.

Is Strike coming back in 2022? ›

Filming is still underway, so the show isn't likely to air until later in 2022 or early 2023. It will air on the BBC in the UK, HBO Max in the US, where the series is known as CB Strike and it's distributed internationally by Warner Bros.

How many strike novels are planned? ›

I propose JKR has decided to divide the sixth and seventh parts of Strike and Robin's story into two books each, which will result in a total of 10 books.

Is Cormoran Strike coming back? ›

Here's what we know so far… Tom Burke and Holliday Grainger, who play Cormoran Strike and Robin Ellacott, shared a snap of themselves on set for the fifth series back in January, and so we think that the show's release date is likely to be right around the corner in either late 2022 or early 2023.

Does Strike kiss Robin? ›

There was the longing look Strike gave Robin as they sat drinking whisky in the office after hours. There was Strike touching his mouth to catch the feel of Robin on his lips after that awkward hug-kiss. There was an arm around shoulders, a confession, a heart-felt compliment and a smile.

Why did Cormoran fire Robin? ›

Robin takes action to protect Noel's stepdaughters from him, which sends Noel on the run. A frustrated Cormoran fires her for misconduct. He later tries to contact her to apologize, but Matthew deletes the evidence of his call from Robin's phone.

Does Strike like Robin? ›

Cormoran Strike and his partner Robin Ellacott are alike in many ways, but also couldn't be more different; whether its their upbringings, their personalities, or even their outlook on life; but together they work as a seamless partnership; like most other successful crime-solving duos throughout history.

How old is Cormoran Strike? ›

Cormoran Strike
Also known as:Name (said by) Bluey (by Charlotte) Bunsen (by Shanker) Cameron, Cameron Strick (mistakenly) Corm (by Leda and Lucy) Hopalong (by Robin's brother Martin) Mystic Bob (by Anstis) Oggy (by Nick and his former partner Hardacre) Stick (by Lucy)
Age:36 40 (as of book 5)
Fate:Alive
Gender:Male
4 more rows

Will there be a new Cormoran Strike book? ›

The Ink Black Heart (A Cormoran Strike Novel, 6) Hardcover – August 30, 2022.

Who is Dennis creed based on? ›

Speaking after the release of the novel, Rowling described its main themes as "change, loss and absence" and that the book examines the "changing face of feminism". She also stated that the character of Dennis Creed was loosely based on real-life killers Jerry Brudos and Russell Williams.

Who else writes like Robert Galbraith? ›

Books To Read If You Like Robert Galbraith
  • Jackal. by Kelly Oliver. Release Date: September 21, 2018. ...
  • Death by the River. by Alexandra Weis & Lucas Astor. Release Date: October 2, 2018. ...
  • What I've Done. by Melinda Leigh. Release Date: September 18, 2018. ...
  • Field of Bones. by J.A. Jance. ...
  • Juror #3. by James Patterson & Nancy Allen.
26 Sept 2018

How many Cordelia Gray books are there? ›

Cordelia Gray is a fictional character created by English author P. D. James. Gray is the protagonist of two novels, An Unsuitable Job for a Woman and of The Skull Beneath the Skin.

How many pages does the ink black heart have? ›

The Ink Black Heart
UK first edition cover
AuthorRobert Galbraith (J. K. Rowling)
PublisherSphere Books
Publication date30 August 2022
Pages1024
5 more rows

Why did J.K. Rowling hide her name? ›

In 1997, first-time author Joanne Rowling's publishers asked her to use her initials rather than her name because they thought her gender might make it hard to sell a fantasy novel about a boy named Harry Potter who discovered that he'd been born a wizard.

Is the author of Harry Potter Anonymous? ›

The author of the Harry Potter series is anonymous. A hostile environment is uncomfortable.

Why is J.K. Rowling writing as Robert Galbraith? ›

Why the name Robert Galbraith? I chose Robert because it's one of my favourite men's names, because Robert F Kennedy is my hero and because, mercifully, I hadn't used it for any of the characters in the Potter series or The Casual Vacancy.

How many words should an author write in a day? ›

Many lesser known or unpublished writers who blog claim word counts anywhere in the range of 500 to 3000 words a day with 1000 being the average. A few writers claim to produce between 4000 and 10,000 words per day.

Does J.K. Rowling use word? ›

In this frame from the film, it is clear she is using Microsoft Word. (Take note of the chapter document icon in the row at the bottom of the screen.) While most accounts tell of Rowling hand-writing the earlier books and using a typewriter for others, by November 2006 she had graduated to a Windows laptop and Word.

What is the purpose of a pen name? ›

A pen name, otherwise known as a pseudonym, is an assumed name that an author will publish under, rather than his or her real name. Some of the most well-known, famous authors have used a pen name to conceal their identities.

Why do writers use pen names? ›

Choosing a pseudonym can open the door to new beginnings and new audiences, reimagining the brand into something fresh. A nom de plume can also help an author jump into new genres, since an author's genre and their name can become inexorably linked.

Who wrote strike? ›

Strike is a British crime drama television programme based on the Cormoran Strike detective novels written by J. K. Rowling under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith.
...
Strike (TV series)
Strike
GenreCrime drama Detective fiction
Based onCormoran Strike by Robert Galbraith
Written byBen Richards Tom Edge
22 more rows

Who revealed Robert Galbraith? ›

"We, Russells solicitors, apologise unreservedly for the disclosure caused by one of our partners, Chris Gossage, in revealing to his wife's best friend, Judith Callegari, during a private conversation, that the true identity of Robert Galbraith was in fact JK Rowling.

Who writes like Robert Galbraith? ›

Books To Read If You Like Robert Galbraith
  • Jackal. by Kelly Oliver. Release Date: September 21, 2018. ...
  • Death by the River. by Alexandra Weis & Lucas Astor. Release Date: October 2, 2018. ...
  • What I've Done. by Melinda Leigh. Release Date: September 18, 2018. ...
  • Field of Bones. by J.A. Jance. ...
  • Juror #3. by James Patterson & Nancy Allen.
26 Sept 2018

How do you legally write under a pen name? ›

You can register a manuscript under a pen name at the copyright office (www.copyright.gov). You'll have to provide some information, including your real address. But if you really want to keep your true identity under wraps, set up a post office box and have information from the office sent there.

Will there be a 7th Cormoran Strike book? ›

On Tuesday, 12th April, J.K. Rowling, on replying to someone on Twitter, revealed that she is currently working on the seventh book in the Strike series! Currently on #7.
...
Detective Leaderboard.
#NameDetective Points
2Mendoza Nicholas5470
3Dr. Werner Madei4675
4DA S2445
5Donna R2155
6 more rows
13 Apr 2022

How was J.K. Rowling pen name discovered? ›

According to the news agency, Gossage told the best friend of his wife, Judith Callegari, and Callegari was the person who tweeted at a Sunday Times columnist last week, stating that she knew Rowling was behind “Cuckoo.” This prompted the newspaper to launch its own investigation and eventually uncover the fact that ...

Why did J.K. Rowling hide her name? ›

In 1997, first-time author Joanne Rowling's publishers asked her to use her initials rather than her name because they thought her gender might make it hard to sell a fantasy novel about a boy named Harry Potter who discovered that he'd been born a wizard.

Is the author of Harry Potter Anonymous? ›

The author of the Harry Potter series is anonymous. A hostile environment is uncomfortable.

What should I read if I like strike? ›

Here are five recommendations for murder mystery books with a Cormoran Strike resonance:
  • (1) John Fairfax's Benson and De Vere courtroom dramas.
  • (2) Ian Rankin's John Rebus novels.
  • (3) P. D. James' Cordelia Gray thrillers.
  • (4) Kate Atkinson's Jackson Brodie books.
  • (5) Boris Akunin's Sister Pelagia mysteries.
2 Oct 2019

What to read if you like Peter May? ›

Authors similar to Peter May
  • Ian Rankin. 5,262 followers. Author of 240 books including Knots and Crosses. ...
  • Ann Cleeves. Author of 96 books including Raven Black. Follow author. ...
  • James W. Hall. ...
  • Martyn Waites. 99 followers. ...
  • Peter James. 2,851 followers. ...
  • Simon King. 8 followers. ...
  • Betty Rowlands. 129 followers. ...
  • Jane Bettany. 67 followers.

How much does a pen name cost? ›

You must pay filing fees of at least $375 when you file your trademark application. If you want trademark protection in multiple commercial classes, you'll have to pay higher fees.

Can you publish on Amazon with a pen name? ›

Yes, you can publish on Amazon with a pseudonym , to preserve your identity, for whatever reason. You can do the same thing on Nook, iBooks, Smashwords and Kobobooks.

Can I publish a book under a fake name? ›

Yes, an author can legally use a pen name or pseudonym to publish their intellectual property. Pen names are legal, as long as you have purchased the rights to your pen name, and have copyrighted your name.

Is Strike coming back in 2022? ›

Filming is still underway, so the show isn't likely to air until later in 2022 or early 2023. It will air on the BBC in the UK, HBO Max in the US, where the series is known as CB Strike and it's distributed internationally by Warner Bros.

How many strike novels are planned? ›

I propose JKR has decided to divide the sixth and seventh parts of Strike and Robin's story into two books each, which will result in a total of 10 books.

Is Cormoran Strike coming back? ›

Here's what we know so far… Tom Burke and Holliday Grainger, who play Cormoran Strike and Robin Ellacott, shared a snap of themselves on set for the fifth series back in January, and so we think that the show's release date is likely to be right around the corner in either late 2022 or early 2023.

Videos

1. The Cuckoo's Calling by Robert Galbraith (aka J.K. Rowling) | Book Review
(rincey reads)
2. THE CUCKOO'S CALLING / J. K. Rowling-Robert Galbraith / Book Review / Brian Lee Durfee
(BRIAN LEE DURFEE Reviews)
3. Book #244 Review - The Ink Black Heart
(Becky book reviews)
4. J.K.Rowling = Robert Galbraith, The Cuckoo's Calling
(SanaSini)
5. The Story Telling Podcast #21: J.K. Rowling (AKA Robert Galbraith) and The Cuckoo's Calling
(Garrett Robinson)
6. Life story of J.K.ROWLING
(Silambarasan C)

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Author: Kareem Mueller DO

Last Updated: 06/02/2022

Views: 6645

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Author information

Name: Kareem Mueller DO

Birthday: 1997-01-04

Address: Apt. 156 12935 Runolfsdottir Mission, Greenfort, MN 74384-6749

Phone: +16704982844747

Job: Corporate Administration Planner

Hobby: Mountain biking, Jewelry making, Stone skipping, Lacemaking, Knife making, Scrapbooking, Letterboxing

Introduction: My name is Kareem Mueller DO, I am a vivacious, super, thoughtful, excited, handsome, beautiful, combative person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.